First cycle
degree courses
Second cycle
degree courses
Single cycle
degree courses
School of Human and Social Sciences and Cultural Heritage
SUSTAINABLE TERRITORIAL DEVELOPMENT
Course unit
HOW TO ENHANCE GROUP INTERACTION AND INTERCULTURAL LEARNING (MOD. B)
SUP7081021, A.A. 2018/19

Information concerning the students who enrolled in A.Y. 2018/19

Information on the course unit
Degree course Second cycle degree in
SUSTAINABLE TERRITORIAL DEVELOPMENT
IA2447, Degree course structure A.Y. 2018/19, A.Y. 2018/19
N0
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Number of ECTS credits allocated 4.0
Type of assessment Mark
Course unit English denomination HOW TO ENHANCE GROUP INTERACTION AND INTERCULTURAL LEARNING (MOD. B)
Website of the academic structure https://www.dissgea.unipd.it/
Department of reference Department of Historical and Geographic Sciences and the Ancient World
Mandatory attendance No
Language of instruction English
Branch PADOVA

Lecturers
Teacher in charge MICHEL ROGER AGIER

Integrated course for this unit
Course unit code Course unit name Teacher in charge
SUP7081020 GROUP INTERACTION AND DYNAMICS (C.I.) ALESSIO SURIAN

Mutuating
Course unit code Course unit name Teacher in charge Degree course code
SUP7080960 HOW TO ENHANCE GROUP INTERACTION AND INTERCULTURAL LEARNING (MOD. B) MICHEL ROGER AGIER SU2297

ECTS: details
Type Scientific-Disciplinary Sector Credits allocated
Core courses SPS/07 General Sociology 4.0

Course unit organization
Period First semester
Year 1st Year
Teaching method frontal

Type of hours Credits Teaching
hours
Hours of
Individual study
Shifts
Lecture 4.0 28 72.0 No turn

Calendar
Start of activities 24/09/2018
End of activities 18/01/2019
Show course schedule 2018/19 Reg.2018 course timetable

Examination board
Examination board not defined

Syllabus

Common characteristics of the Integrated Course unit

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of interpersonal communication and community planning issues.
Target skills and knowledge: Learning outcomes: The course aims at developing students competences concerning five main areas of community work. therefore, at the end of the course the students will have enhanced competences in relation to:
Understanding socio-economic change and its relation with transformative learning and group dynamics
Understanding and applying the three dimensions of learning
Applying proper questioning to facilitate territorial learning as relational activity.
Understanding and facilitating shared leadership in relation to the three dimensions of group communication
facilitating cooperative learning as territorial and participatory activity.

Contents: Socio-economic change and its relation with transformative learning and group dynamics
The three dimensions of learning
Territorial learning as relational activity: the role of questioning
Shared leadership and the three dimensions of group communication
Cooperative learning as territorial and participatory activity: the role of the future dimension
Examination methods: There is a wide range of assessment approaches. Such approaches concern formative as well as summative goals. This is in line with the targeted learning outcomes focusing on knowledge and insights, skills and application abilities and communication in a balanced way. The variety of assessment approaches is also due to the fact that courses are offered in combinations with different study programmes belonging to different Universities.

The first group of exams is written and they are usually written essays. This type of assessment allows for a more creative and research-oriented approach. When the essay reflects the students’ own research, s/he must show the ability to clearly formulate the research question(s), to organize and conduct a research, to apply proper methods, to be able to collect data in the field and to analyze those data.

Next, students need to be able to discuss the results and to place them within the broader scientific debate. Furthermore, the structure and the writing of the essay have to comply with proper and academic writing rules. In many cases process evaluation, peer assessment and/or a presentation are linked with the writing of the essay.

The second group of exams is implemented in oral ways. In this way, they can be individualized and are more interactive. Many courses have a policy of oral exams as standardized procedure (questions, presentation, peer/self-assessment). This allows students to express themselves in an active and dialogical way.

Oral exams are especially suited for testing understanding/insights and application of knowledge as they encourage students to produce clear communication and to manifest their personal attitudes. As for essays, an integrative oral assessment allows for a more creative and research-oriented approach.

Intermediate assessments are generally used in a formative way in order to provide students with timely feedback, while final assessments are used in a summative way. Peers assessment results can influence the final mark of an individual.
Assessment criteria: Students essays are checked in relation to the key community communication practices and models as outlined in Tufte T., Mefalopulos P., Participatory Communication. A Practical Guide. Washington: World Bank, 2009. http://siteresources.worldbank

Specific characteristics of the Module

Course unit contents: This Seminar-style class will address the theoretical issues of Global Migration as a relation between Mobility and (reconstruction of) Locality. Empirical cases and contexts of exiles, refugees and migrants will give the opportunity to propose and discuss some theoretical issues such as the “thickness” of the border (a “Borderland”); the critical question of Humanitarian Government and Encampment in Africa, Middle East and European contexts; and how Hospitality is being reinvented and politicized in the context of European “refugee crisis”. Theoretical analysis and empirical ethnographic data will combine in some exemplary case studies: the Calais’ jungle, Dadaab’ Camp in Kenya, Greece border in Patras, etc.
Additional notes about suggested reading: Arendt, Hannah, “We refugees” (1943), in Altogether Elsewhere (edited by Marc Robinson), Faber and Faber, Boston, 1994, p. 110-119.

Liisa Malkki, « Refugees and Exile: From “Refugee Studies” to the National Order of Things », Annual Reviews of Anthropology, n° 24, 1995, p. 495-523.

Michel Agier, Managing the Undesirables. Refugees Camps and Humanitarian Government, Polity press, 2013.

Michel Agier, 2010, “Humanity as an Identity and its Political Effects. A Note on Camps and Humanitarian Government”, Humanity, University of Pennsylvania Press, n° 1, p. 29-45.

Michel Agier et al., The Jungle. Calais’ camps and Migrants, Polity press, 2018; French version: La Jungle de Calais. Les migrants, la frontière et la camp, PUF, mars 2018; Italian version: La Giungla di Calais. I migranti, la frontiera e il campo, Ombre corte,

Hala Abou-Zaki, « Revisiting politics in spaces ‘beyond the center’: The Shātīlā Palestinian Refugee Camp in Lebanon », in BOUZIANE M., HARDERS C., HOFFMANN A. (dir.), Local Politics and Contemporary Transformations in the Arab World. Revisiting governance beyond the center, Palgrave, 2014.

Mohamed Kamel Doraï (2010), “Palestinian Refugee camps in Lebanon. Migration, mobility, and the urbanization process”, in Are Knudsen & Sari Hanafi, ed. Palestinian Refugees. Identity, space and place in the Levant, London, Routledge, p. 67-80.
Michel Foucault, “Of Other Spaces, Heterotopias » (1967), Architecture, Mouvement, Continuité, 5, 1984, p.46-49.

Zygmunt Bauman, Wasted Lives. Modernity and its Outcasts, Polity press, 2004
Textbooks (and optional supplementary readings)