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Second cycle
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degree courses
School of Economics and Political Science
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DIPLOMACY
Course unit
EU-USA RELATIONS
EPP8084331, A.A. 2019/20

Information concerning the students who enrolled in A.Y. 2018/19

Information on the course unit
Degree course Second cycle degree in
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DIPLOMACY
EP2449, Degree course structure A.Y. 2018/19, A.Y. 2019/20
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Degree course track STORIA E POLITICA INTERNAZIONALE [002PD]
Number of ECTS credits allocated 6.0
Type of assessment Mark
Course unit English denomination EU-USA RELATIONS
Department of reference Department of Political Science, Law, and International Studies
Mandatory attendance No
Language of instruction English
Branch PADOVA
Single Course unit The Course unit can be attended under the option Single Course unit attendance
Optional Course unit The Course unit can be chosen as Optional Course unit

Lecturers
Teacher in charge STEVEN JOSEPH COLATRELLA

Mutuating
Course unit code Course unit name Teacher in charge Degree course code
EPP8084331 EU-USA RELATIONS STEVEN JOSEPH COLATRELLA EP2444

ECTS: details
Type Scientific-Disciplinary Sector Credits allocated
Core courses SPS/04 Polticial Science 6.0

Course unit organization
Period First semester
Year 2nd Year
Teaching method frontal

Type of hours Credits Teaching
hours
Hours of
Individual study
Shifts
Lecture 6.0 45 105.0 No turn

Calendar
Start of activities 23/09/2019
End of activities 18/01/2020
Show course schedule 2019/20 Reg.2018 course timetable

Examination board
Examination board not defined

Syllabus
Prerequisites: A basic knowledge of the concepts of political science and of international relations.
Target skills and knowledge: At the end of the course, students will have acquired an understanding of the fundamental concepts of political theory, theories of international relations and the most important issues in EU-US relations. They will be able to identify the main theoretical schools in the central debates on international issues and will have gained an understanding of the most important theorists, both classical and contemporary, in the field; they will have gained a familiarity with the institutions, political cultures, political histories, and international relations of the EU and the United States, and relations between them; students will have acquired the ability to do research on the theoretical and practical problems of international politics, and on important sources for studying both political communities of interest; they will know the most useful sources for research, they will write a paper on a topic of their choice, approved by the professor, they will gain practice in presenting their research and their ideas to others.
Examination methods: Attendance, although not mandatory, is recommended.
Exam methods for attending students: two research papers on topics relevant to the course material, chosen by the student and approved by the professor, of about 3000 words (or 10 pages, double-space, with fonts of 12 points), using a minimum of 5 citations of academic works (together with other non-academic cited sources) and a presentation of the research to the class. The essay must include a topic, the discussion of several points of view or theoretical approaches on the question discussed and must be linked to the topics studied during the lessons; Each paper will be worth 40% of the final grade, for a total of 80%. One paper is to be turned in in written form during the period of class sessions, and the other may be turned in in time for the appello for the exam. But students must present each to the class during the class sessions. The class presentations will be worth 10% of the final grade and participation in the class discussions will be worth 10%.
More specific information will be made available during a lesson at the beginning of the course.

For non-attending students: two research papers on topics relevant to the course material, chosen by the student and approved by the professor, of about 4000 words (or 12-14 pages, double-space, with fonts of 12 points), using a minimum of 8 citations of academic works (together with other quoted sources of a non-academic nature) and using ideas, concepts, data or citazions from the books read for the course in addition to those from other sources utilized. Each paper will be worth 50% of the final grade.
Assessment criteria: Evaluation criteria: for attending students the evaluation will have two components: 1) the student's ability to formulate an argument, the quality of the research and the depth of analysis shown in the thesis; 2) the ability of the student to understand the theories, the problems, the different levels of analysis and different forms of political and social order and the national and international institutions studied in the course, expressed both in writing in the term paper and orally during the participation in the class discussions and the presentation of their research to the class at the end of the course.
For non-attending students the evaluation will have two components: 1) the argumentative capacity, the quality of the research and the depth of analysis shown in the thesis; 2) the ability of the student to understand the theories, the problems, the different levels of analysis and the forms of order and international institutions studied in the course, expressed in writing in the essay and in the examination on the bibliographic works indicated for non-attending students.
Course unit contents: General Part: The course is divided into 5 parts: 1) the concepts of state and politics in Europe and the United States; 2) theories of international relations, with emphasis on the two studied political communities; 3) comparative analyzes of institutions, political and practical cultures of the EU and the USA; 4) political, economic, diplomatic, cultural and military relations between the EU and the US; 5) the global challenges facing both the EU and the US: the ecological crisis, globalization, the rise of China, Russia, terrorism, debates on immigration, wars, and new nationalisms.

Thematic part: the search for alternatives - we will study the proposals from various fields and actors for solutions to recognized problems and the proposed alternatives to current models of politics, economy, and institutional structures.
Planned learning activities and teaching methods: Traditional lesson format combined with seminar discussions with student participation in class discussions.

The course is organized in the following parts:

In the general part we will discuss the following:

1) State and political concepts in Europe and the United States:

Aristotle and the good life, Plato and justice
Machiavelli and classical republicanism
Hobbes and Sovereignty, Locke and Contract Theory
Rousseau and Marsilio of Padua and popular sovereignty
James Madison and the founders of the United States
Marxist, anarchist and environmentalist ideas and strategies
Feminist and post-modern ideas of politics and the state

2) Theories of international relations
Realism: Morgenthau, Carr, Waltz and Mearsheimer
Liberal internationalism and institutionalism: Angell, Keohane, Nye
3) Grozian ideas of international relations, Bull and the English school
4) Democratic peace and Kant

3) Comparative analysis of institutions, political and practical cultures in the EU and the United States
Central and federal states
The EU institutions (ECB, Commission, Parliament, Council)
US institutions (President, Congress, Judiciary, Federal Reserve)
Party systems, bipartisan and multiparty systems
Electoral systems, first proportionality, proportional representation and others
Decision process
Interest groups
American political culture: Calvinism, liberal individualism, markets, race and ethnicity, militarism, isolationism, social movements for change and reform.
European political cultures - historical left and right, Catholicism and Protestantism, secularism, legacy of the French revolution, socialism and communism, fascism, nationalism, social movements for change and reform.

4) Relations between the United States and the EU
Relations between the era of the Cold War and the United States and Europe
BORN
The economic relations of the 1990s and the rise and fall of Bretton Woods and the oil crises
EU expansion post 1989
"Who should I call to talk to Europe?" (Henry Kissinger)
The crisis of Bosnia
NATO expansion
The euro and the dollar
The crisis of the Iraq war in relations
Unilateralism and multilateralism in US foreign policy
Does Europe have a foreign policy?
The 2008 crisis and EU-US policies and relations
EU-US relations after Trump

5) Global challenges for the EU and the United States
Climate change and EU and US responses (as they are!)
Globalization, free trade, TPP, competition, large companies
The rule of finance
The Rise of China
The New Nationalisms and responses
Russia and NATO, Georgia, Ukraine and Syria
Debates on immigration
Wars and terrorism

Thematic part: the search for alternatives
Ecological and local proposals
A return of national sovereignty?
A return of popular sovereignty?
Socialisms of the 21st century
21st century nationalisms
A multicenter world?
A pluralist world?
A clash of civilizations?
Can Europe be saved?
Is America's decline inevitable?
Additional notes about suggested reading: REQUIRED READING FOR ALL STUDENTS:


John Gillingham, The EU: An Obituary. London and New York: Verso, 2018. Second Edition

Yanis Varoufakis, Adults In The Room: My Battle With Europe’s Deep Establishment. London and New York: Vintage, 2018.

John Judis, The Nationalist Revival: Trade, Immigration, and the Revolt Against Globalization. New York: Columbia Global Reports, 2018.

Geir Lundestad, United States and Western Europe Since 1945: From "Empire" by Invitation to Transatlantic Drift. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2005.


NOT REQUIRED FOR ATTENDING STUDENTS:

NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS MUST ALSO READ THE FOLLOWING TWO BOOKS IN ADDITION TO THE 4 BOOKS THAT ARE REQUIRED FOR ALL STUDENTS


Perry Anderson, American Foreign Policy and Its Thinkers. London: Verso, 2017.

Robert Cooper,The Breaking of Nations (Italian version:) La fine delle nazioni: ordine e caos nel 21esimo secolo. Torino: Landau, 2004
Textbooks (and optional supplementary readings)
  • John Gillingham, The EU: An Obituary. London and New York: Verso, 2018. Cerca nel catalogo
  • Yanis Varoufakis, Adults In The Room: My Battle With Europe’s Deep Establishment. London and New York: Vintage, 2018. Cerca nel catalogo
  • John Judis, The Nationalist Revival: Trade, Immigration, and the Revolt Against Globalization. New York: Columbia Global Reports, 2018. Cerca nel catalogo
  • Geir Lundestad, United States and Western Europe Since 1945: From "Empire" by Invitation to Transatlantic Drift. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2005. Cerca nel catalogo