First cycle
degree courses
Second cycle
degree courses
Single cycle
degree courses
School of Human and Social Sciences and Cultural Heritage
PHILOSOPHICAL SCIENCES
Course unit
MORAL PHILOSOPHY
SUP5070217, A.A. 2015/16

Information concerning the students who enrolled in A.Y. 2015/16

Information on the course unit
Degree course Second cycle degree in
PHILOSOPHICAL SCIENCES
LE0614, Degree course structure A.Y. 2008/09, A.Y. 2015/16
N0
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Number of ECTS credits allocated 6.0
Type of assessment Mark
Course unit English denomination MORAL PHILOSOPHY
Department of reference Department of Philosophy, Sociology, Education and Applied Psychology
Mandatory attendance No
Language of instruction English
Branch PADOVA
Single Course unit The Course unit can be attended under the option Single Course unit attendance
Optional Course unit The Course unit can be chosen as Optional Course unit

Lecturers
Teacher in charge ROMANA BASSI M-FIL/03

ECTS: details
Type Scientific-Disciplinary Sector Credits allocated
Educational activities in elective or integrative disciplines M-FIL/03 Moral Philosophy 6.0

Course unit organization
Period First semester
Year 1st Year
Teaching method frontal

Type of hours Credits Teaching
hours
Hours of
Individual study
Shifts
Lecture 6.0 42 108.0 No turn

Calendar
Start of activities 28/09/2015
End of activities 23/01/2016
Show course schedule 2019/20 Reg.2008 course timetable

Examination board
Board From To Members of the board
1 MORAL PHILOSOPHY 2015-2016 01/10/2016 30/11/2017 BASSI ROMANA (Presidente)
BIASUTTI FRANCO (Membro Effettivo)
CUTTINI ELISA (Supplente)
SALIS RITA MARIA GAVINA (Supplente)

Syllabus
Prerequisites: PREREQUISITES:

1. Knowledge of the English language;

2. ability to analyse and discuss philosophical texts in your mothertongue language;

3. preliminary basic knowledge of virtue ethics is recommended, however not strictly required.
Target skills and knowledge: SETS OF KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITY TO BE DEVELOPED DURING THE COURSE:

A. knowledge of virtue ethics, its main traits, its implications and problems, its challenges and aspects open to discussion in the contemporary debate;

B. ability to "close read" contemporary philosophical texts, to develop linguistic correctedness and precision;

C. ability to develop conceptual analysis of premises and arguments in texts;

D. ability of synthesis and of identifying thesis in philosophical texts;

E. ability to discuss philosophical thesis, to provide sound arguments and critical re-elaboration;

G. ability to bring into the discussion of a philosophical text references and links to the present and past philosophical tradition.
Examination methods: EVALUATION METHODOLOGY AND FINAL EXAM:

For attending students:
level of attendance, participation to discussions in classroom, oral presentations during the course and the final oral exam, all contribute to the global evaluation. A non-compulsory, written paper may be considered as a substitute for part of the final oral exam. In this case it has to be turned in by email by 7th January 2016. Further information about it is to be given during the course.

For non-attending students:
the exam is oral.
Assessment criteria: EVALUATION CRITERIA

Both for attending and non-attending students, both for oral presentations/exam and for written papers the evaluation criteria are based on assessment of:

- ability of analysis (correctedness, linguistic precision, etc.),

- ability of synthesis,

- ability to discuss philosophical thesis,

- ability to provide sound arguments and critical re-elaboration.
Course unit contents: COURSE DESCRIPTION

Julia Anna's Intelligent Virtue will serve us as a guideline, in order to help us tackle a set of issues widely discussed in the contemporary debate about virtue ethics. Among these, for instance: how is the structure of virtue to be understood? (how) can a skill analogy help there? in what relationship does virtue stand with the notion of practical intelligence? how are character and disposition to be intended? is virtue socially embedded? if so, how can accounts of virtue aspire to be universal? and how are they to face the objection of relativism?
Planned learning activities and teaching methods: TEACHING METHODOLIGIES:

Close reading of the text, conceptual analysis, introductory frontal lessons, open or guided discussions, work in groups and presentations from groups of students.
Additional notes about suggested reading: ABOUT ATTENDANCE AND NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS:
Students willing to take this exams are advised to attend the lessons and the whole course. In case this is impossible, they should contact the professor and discuss a special programme. In general, non-attending students must add to their reading material one among the following works:

- Jennifer A. Herdt, Putting on Virtue. The legacy of the Splendid Vices, The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 2008;

- J. Kraye and R. Saarinnen eds., Moral Philosophy on the Threshold of Modernity, Springer, Dordrecht, 2005;

- R.L. Sandler, Character and Environment. A Virtue-oriented approach to Environmental Ethics, Columbia Unviersity Press, New York, 2007.
Textbooks (and optional supplementary readings)
  • Julia Annas, Intelligent virtue. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Cerca nel catalogo