First cycle
degree courses
Second cycle
degree courses
Single cycle
degree courses
School of Science
INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY
Course unit
APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY
SC02119323, A.A. 2017/18

Information concerning the students who enrolled in A.Y. 2017/18

Information on the course unit
Degree course Second cycle degree in
INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY
SC1170, Degree course structure A.Y. 2015/16, A.Y. 2017/18
N0
bring this page
with you
Number of ECTS credits allocated 6.0
Type of assessment Mark
Course unit English denomination APPLIED SPECTROSCOPY
Department of reference Department of Chemical Sciences
Mandatory attendance No
Language of instruction Italian
Branch PADOVA
Single Course unit The Course unit can be attended under the option Single Course unit attendance
Optional Course unit The Course unit can be chosen as Optional Course unit

Lecturers
Teacher in charge DANILO PEDRON CHIM/02
Other lecturers LORENZO FRANCO CHIM/02

ECTS: details
Type Scientific-Disciplinary Sector Credits allocated
Core courses CHIM/02 Physical Chemistry 6.0

Mode of delivery (when and how)
Period First semester
Year 1st Year
Teaching method frontal

Organisation of didactics
Type of hours Credits Hours of
teaching
Hours of
Individual study
Shifts
Laboratory 2.0 24 26.0 4
Lecture 4.0 32 68.0 No turn

Calendar
Start of activities 02/10/2017
End of activities 19/01/2018

Syllabus
Prerequisites: B.Sc. level knowledge of Physical chemistry and Laboratory of physical chemistry.
Target skills and knowledge: To provide the students with basic knowledge and methodological skills in optical and magnetic spectroscopy. Application of spectroscopic techniques in the control of industrial processes and for the characterization of products will also be discussed.
Examination methods: Evaluation of the laboratory reports and oral exam.
Assessment criteria: Ability to present arguments during the oral examination and the ability to draft scientific reports on laboratory experiments carried out.
Course unit contents: Basic description of the electromagnetic radiation and general introduction to spectroscopy.
Interaction light-matter, absorption and emission processes and selection rules, electric and magnetic dipole interactions; Fermi golden rule of spectroscopy.
Einstein phenomenological theory of absorption end emission of radiation by atomic or molecular systems.
Electric polarization and propagation of electromagnetic radiation in matter. Refractive index and absorption coefficient, their functional behavior in correspondence of resonance. Intensity and profile of absorption bands, homogeneous and inhomogeneous line width. Kramers – Krönig relations in spectroscopy.
Factorization of molecular spectroscopy.
IR absorption spectroscopy. Vibrational problem for diatomic molecules, absorption selection rules for fundamental and overtone transitions, role of potential anharmonicity. Vibrational problem for polyatomic molecules, normal modes. IR absorption spectra of polyatomic molecules, selection rules for fundamental, overtone and combination vibrational transitions. Localization of vibrations and group frequencies.
NIR absorption spectroscopy, its use to monitoring industrial processes.
Reflectance spectroscopy: diffuse and specular reflectance measurements, ATR infrared spectroscopy.
UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy: electronic and vibronic transitions, Franck – Condon progressions, interpretation of UV-Vis absorption spectra of organic molecules.
Emission spectroscopy: fluorescence and phosphorescence, radiative emission, lifetimes and fate of electronic excited states.
Raman spectroscopy and its application to industrial chemistry and material science.
NMR spectroscopy: basic principles, magnetic relaxation and Fourier transform techniques. Application of NMR spectroscopy for characterization of polymer conformations, and analysis of edible oils.

Experimental activity in the laboratory:

1) FT – IR absorption spectroscopy, FT – IR ATR spectroscopy, specular reflectance measurements.
2) Macro and Micro – Raman spectroscopy.
3) FT – NMR spectroscopy.
Planned learning activities and teaching methods: Classroom lectures, classroom and laboratory applied activities.
Additional notes about suggested reading: Lecture notes of teachers, specialist books and recommended scientific articles.
Textbooks (and optional supplementary readings)
  • P.W. Atkins and J. De Paula, Atkins’ Physical Chemistry. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Cerca nel catalogo