First cycle
degree courses
Second cycle
degree courses
Single cycle
degree courses
School of Psychology
CLINICAL DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Course unit
PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF POWER AND STATUS
PSP6074678, A.A. 2017/18

Information concerning the students who enrolled in A.Y. 2017/18

Information on the course unit
Degree course Second cycle degree in
CLINICAL DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
PS2292, Degree course structure A.Y. 2016/17, A.Y. 2017/18
N0
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Number of ECTS credits allocated 3.0
Type of assessment Evaluation
Course unit English denomination PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF POWER AND STATUS
Department of reference Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialisation
Mandatory attendance No
Language of instruction English
Branch PADOVA
Single Course unit The Course unit CANNOT be attended under the option Single Course unit attendance
Optional Course unit The Course unit is available ONLY for students enrolled in CLINICAL DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Lecturers
Teacher in charge ROBERTO DE VOGLI M-PSI/08

ECTS: details
Type Scientific-Disciplinary Sector Credits allocated
Other -- -- 3.0

Mode of delivery (when and how)
Period First semester
Year 1st Year
Teaching method frontal

Organisation of didactics
Type of hours Credits Hours of
teaching
Hours of
Individual study
Shifts
Lecture 3.0 21 54.0 No turn

Calendar
Start of activities 09/10/2017
End of activities 12/01/2018

Examination board
Examination board not defined

Syllabus
Prerequisites: Basic statistics and ability to read and understand a peer-reviewed scientific article in English language and attendance (previous or contemporary) of the course “Psychology, Power and Mental Health.”

Students are invited to get in touch with the instructor (roberto.devogli@unipd.it) in order to know whether the course will actually take place.
Target skills and knowledge: The course contributes to strengthen the following students’ skills:

1. Identify basic theories, concepts and models investigating the role of the main components of the Dominance Behavioral System (DBS) in both the onset and solution of a range of psychopathologies
2. Apply evidence-based reasoning to identify how thoughts, emotions and behaviors are affected by the Dominance Behavioral System (DBS)
3. Conduct practical-based assessments to measure the components of the Dominance Behavioral System (DBS)
4. Conduct practical-based assessments (either quantitative or qualitative) to study the psychopathologies associated either heightened dominance motivation and behaviors (e.g. conduct disorder, antisocial personality, psychopathy, mania and narcissistic personality traits), or subordination and submissiveness (e.g. anxiety and depression)
5. Deliver an oral presentation on a project assessing either some aspects of the Dominance Behavioral System (DBS) and their links to psychopathologies or personality disorders
Examination methods: Conduct practical-based assessments (either quantitative or qualitative) to study the psychopathologies associated either heightened dominance motivation and behaviors (e.g. conduct disorder, antisocial personality, psychopathy, mania and narcissistic personality traits), or subordination and submissiveness (e.g. anxiety and depression) Students will also deliver an oral presentation of their project.
Assessment criteria: Quality of the presentation and discussion of the practical-based assessments.
Course unit contents: • The Dominance Behavioral System (DBS) and its components
• Measuring the Dominance Behavioral System: Self-Reported, Implicit, Observational and Biological
• Measuring Psychopathologies of Heightened Dominance Motivation (“Omnipotence): Conduct Disorder, Antisocial Personality, Psychopathy, Mania and Narcissistic Personality Traits
• Measuring Psychopathologies of Subordination and Submissiveness (“Impotence”): Anxiety and Depression
• Survey Research Methods to study the Psychopathologies of the Dominance Behavioral System (DBS)
• Qualitative Research Methods to study the Psychopathologies of the Dominance Behavioral System (DBS)
• Experimental Methods to study the Psychopathologies of the Dominance Behavioral System (DBS)
Planned learning activities and teaching methods: The course consists of lectures, classroom participation and presentations. Students will be asked to run a small practical project (either quantitative or qualitative) to study the psychopathologies associated either heightened dominance motivation and behaviors (e.g. conduct disorder, antisocial personality, psychopathy, mania and narcissistic personality traits), or subordination and submissiveness (e.g. anxiety and depression)
Additional notes about suggested reading: There are no textbooks. All readings will be available to be downloaded from the course website once you have registered for the course.

1. Boddy C. The Corporate Psychopaths Theory and the Global Financial Crisis. Journal of Business Ethics 2011;102:255-259.

2. Boddy C. et al. Extreme managers, extreme workplaces: Capitalism, organizations and corporate psychopaths. Organization 2015; 22(4):530-551.

3. Babiak P. et al. Corporate Psychopathy: Talking the Walk. Behavioral Sciences and the Law 2010; 28:174-193.

4. Owen D. Hubris Syndrome. Clin Med 2008;8:428-32.

5. Owen D. and Davidson J. Hubris Syndrome: An Acquired Personality Disorder? A Study of US Presidents and UK Prime Ministers over the last 100 Years. Brain 2009;132:1396-1406.
6. Leadership and the rise of Corporate Psychopaths: What Can Business Schools do about the “Snakes Inside”? e-Journal of Social & Behvioral Research in Business 2011;2(2):18-27.

7. Johnson SL et al. The Dominance Behavioral System and Psychopathology: Evidence from Self-Report, Observational and Biological Studies Psychological Bulletin, 2012.

8. Conway JF. The Political Economy and Etiology of Psychopathology: An Essay. Socialism and Democracy 2012; 26(1):36-57.

9. Merzagora Isabella. Psychology and Psychopathology of White Collar Crime. In: Organized Crime, Corruption and Crime Prevention pp.169-177 2013.

10. Reveley J. Neoliberal Meditations: How Mindfulness Training Medicalizes Education and Responsibilizes Young People. Policy Futures in Education 2016.

11. Raven BH et al. Conceptualizing and Measuring a Power/Interaction Model of Interpersonal Influence 2006. Having a Thicker Skin: Social Power Buffers the Negative Effects of Social Rejection.

12. Sturm RE and Antonakis J. Interpersonal Power: A Review, Critique and Research Agenda. Journal of Management, 2015.
Textbooks (and optional supplementary readings)