First cycle
degree courses
Second cycle
degree courses
Single cycle
degree courses
School of Human and Social Sciences and Cultural Heritage
LOCAL DEVELOPMENT
Course unit
TERRITORY AND LOCAL DEVELOPMENT
SFM1026972, A.A. 2017/18

Information concerning the students who enrolled in A.Y. 2016/17

Information on the course unit
Degree course Second cycle degree in
LOCAL DEVELOPMENT - SVILUPPO LOCALE (Ord. 2016)
SU2297, Degree course structure A.Y. 2016/17, A.Y. 2017/18
N0
bring this page
with you
Number of ECTS credits allocated 6.0
Type of assessment Mark
Course unit English denomination TERRITORY AND LOCAL DEVELOPMENT
Department of reference Department of Historical and Geographic Sciences and the Ancient World
Mandatory attendance No
Language of instruction English
Branch PADOVA
Single Course unit The Course unit can be attended under the option Single Course unit attendance
Optional Course unit The Course unit can be chosen as Optional Course unit

Lecturers
Teacher in charge DAVID CELETTI SECS-P/12
Other lecturers MARINA BERTONCIN M-GGR/01
DARIA QUATRIDA M-GGR/01

ECTS: details
Type Scientific-Disciplinary Sector Credits allocated
Core courses M-GGR/01 Geography 6.0

Mode of delivery (when and how)
Period First semester
Year 2nd Year
Teaching method frontal

Organisation of didactics
Type of hours Credits Hours of
teaching
Hours of
Individual study
Shifts
Lecture 6.0 42 108.0 No turn

Calendar
Start of activities 02/10/2017
End of activities 19/01/2018

Examination board
Examination board not defined

Syllabus
Prerequisites: No prerequisites are requested
Target skills and knowledge: • Students will be able to understand the inner dynamics that determine wealth distribution and development processes, as well as to assess the conditions that enabled – and enable – certain areas of the world to gain better access to wealth and social welfare.
• Students will be able to gain the analytical tools for analysing development processes working on two specific case studies, linking, within a single framework, economic, social, and cultural aspects. They will also gain awareness of the potentialities of multidisciplinary, diachronic and comparative models for explaining development processes and results.
• Students will be able to recognize and analyse the different stages of fieldwork (such as its preliminary conditions, its making and the final write-up of the research), through a reflexive approach.
• Students will familiarise themselves with the complexity of the actual practice in a territorial development context (i.e. the Po Delta case study) by focusing on local development interventions (context, content, process and policy). They will acquire insights into the effectiveness of territorial development strategies that are put into place; the manner in which development is intended, pursued and assessed; the problems that appear; the way they are solved; and the impact they have on the local communities.
Examination methods: Proff. Bertoncin and Quatrida Module
- Students attending classes (Part I) and the residential seminar (Part II) will be evaluated on a final individual report on the Po Delta Seminar.
- Non- attending students will receive a grade based on a closed-book oral exam on the following texts:
1. Helling, L., Serrano, R. & Warren, D. (2005), “Linking Community Empowerment, Decentralized Governance and Public Service Provision through a Local Development Framework”, World Bank, pp. 79.
2. Rose, G. (1997) “Situating knowledges: positionality, reflexivities and other tactics”, Progress in Human Geography, 21, 3, pp. 305-320.

Prof. Celetti Module
- Attending Students: will receive a grade based on a closed-book oral exam on slides, articles and written material given during the course.

- Non attending students: will receive a grade based on a closed-book oral exam on one of the following texts:
1. Rist G., The History of Development From Western Origins to Global Faith, 3rd Edition,. London: Zed Books, 2003
2. Ha-Joon Chang, Kicking Away the Ladder - Development Strategy in Historical Perspective. London: Anthem Press, 2002
Assessment criteria: Students will receive a final grade for the course based on the two course modules, each module worth 50% of the course grade.

Proff. Bertoncin and Quatrida Module

Students attending classes (Part I) and the residential seminar (Part II) will be evaluated on a final individual report on the Po Delta Seminar. This report is marked in thirtieths and will be assessed according to the following criteria:
Process - the ability to analyse academic arguments (planning, independence, insight) 25%;
Content - comprehension of theoretical concepts (introduction and problem statement, argumentation, results: discussion and interpretation, conclusion, coherence and logical composition, originality, depth) 50%;
Form - competence in communicating intellectual ideas (layout, tables/figures, language/spelling/style, size - within the given directive-) 25%..
Non- attending students will receive a grade based on a closed-book oral exam on the following texts:
1. Helling, L., Serrano, R. & Warren, D. (2005), “Linking Community Empowerment, Decentralized Governance and Public Service Provision through a Local Development Framework”, World Bank, pp. 79.
2. Rose, G. (1997) “Situating knowledges: positionality, reflexivities and other tactics”, Progress in Human Geography, 21, 3, pp. 305-320.

Prof. Celetti Module
Attending Students: will receive a grade based on a closed-book oral exam on slides, articles and written material given during the course.
Non attending students: will receive a grade based on a closed-book oral exam on one of the following texts:
1. Rist G., The History of Development From Western Origins to Global Faith, 3rd Edition,. London: Zed Books, 2003
2. Ha-Joon Chang, Kicking Away the Ladder - Development Strategy in Historical Perspective. London: Anthem Press, 2002
Course unit contents: The first module (1 CFU Quatrida + 2 CFU Bertoncin) is organized in two parts.
Part I, in class, provides a practical introduction to theoretical issues and challenges associated with fieldwork. The module will cover the tree main stages of fieldwork experience (the preparatory moment; the “being” in the field and the final write-up of the research) to stimulate a self-reflexive analysis and positioning. Students will be involved in the analysis and presentation (in groups) of a peculiar aspect of fieldwork for creating a final and shared gaze on its practical and social implications.
Part II is mainly dedicated to an experiential seminar in the Po Delta of Italy (Ca’ Vendramin, Porto Tolle, 9-11 November 2017) during which students will apply and learn the practical issues in the evolution and management of the territory. The case is situated on a very local scale but it deals with “glocal” and global phenomena (place management, environmental issues, such as pollution). The purpose of the residential seminar is to introduce students to the actor - power - project justification and direction (= frame) displayed in a multitude of selected experiences in a particular time/space setting. Students from Local Development will work in teams with students from Sustainable Territorial Development. Each team will develop research goals, plan a questionnaire instrument approach, and gather data by conducting interviews of stakeholders and other representatives of the Po Delta. Students will write the results of their research in a report (see examination guidelines).
Planned learning activities and teaching methods: Instructional Methods
Several teaching methods and work forms are combined to reinforce concepts in this course.
- Lectures
Concepts in development and territorial development processes will be covered in the lectures.
- Working group
Students will work in group in order to socialize and to compare knowledge and information, exchange views and opinions. The reference approach for the working groups setting is the cooperative learning that enhances the sharing of resources, knowledge and skills, differences in cognitive styles, the ability to communicate, and it contributes to the creation of an educational, non-competitive, highly responsible and collaborative environment.
- Fieldwork Experience
Students will participate in the 3-day Po Delta Residential Seminar to learn first-hand the issues and perception/cognition of the stakeholders in the Delta. Engagement with these stakeholders will reveal and likely other, more recent issues of interest to the Delta communities.
- Paper discussion
Papers focusing on the definition of development, development related experiences, and development policies will be given to the students, to be afterwards analysed and discussed together. Students are expected to actively participate to the discussion, bringing new ideas and interpretation. Innovative views and analysis will be highly appreciated.
- Instructor Contact
Students may consult with the instructors for additional assistance on the course lecture topics or laboratory exercises by reaching out to the instructors during their office hours, through email, or other appropriately designated method.
Additional notes about suggested reading: Course Material
• Slides from presentations and lectures, on moodle
• Info documents for workshops and assignment form for the report, on moodle
• Recent articles from scientific journals and books, on moodle
• Compulsory books for non attending students (see examination guidelines)
Textbooks (and optional supplementary readings)
  • Helling, L., Serrano, R. & Warren, D., Linking Community Empowerment, Decentralized Governance and Public Service Provision through a Local Development Framework”. --: WORLD BANK, 2005.
  • Rose, G., “Situating knowledges: positionality, reflexivities and other tactics”. --: --, --. Progress in Human Geography, 21, 3, pp. 305-320.
  • Rist G, The History of Development From Western Origins to Global Faith. LONDON: Zed Books, 2003.
  • Ha-Joon Chang, Kicking Away the Ladder - Development Strategy in Historical Perspective. LONDON: Anthem Press, 2002. Cerca nel catalogo