First cycle
degree courses
Second cycle
degree courses
Single cycle
degree courses
School of Human and Social Sciences and Cultural Heritage
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
Course unit
ANGLO-AMERICAN LITERATURE 2
LEM0012615, A.A. 2017/18

Information concerning the students who enrolled in A.Y. 2015/16

Information on the course unit
Degree course First cycle degree in
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
LE0603, Degree course structure A.Y. 2008/09, A.Y. 2017/18
N0
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Number of ECTS credits allocated 9.0
Type of assessment Mark
Course unit English denomination ANGLO-AMERICAN LITERATURE 2
Department of reference Department of Linguistic and Literary Studies
Mandatory attendance No
Language of instruction English, Italian
Branch PADOVA
Single Course unit The Course unit can be attended under the option Single Course unit attendance
Optional Course unit The Course unit can be chosen as Optional Course unit

Lecturers
Teacher in charge ANNA SCACCHI L-LIN/11

Mutuated
Course unit code Course unit name Teacher in charge Degree course code
SUP6076057 ANGLO-AMERICAN LITERATURE ANNA SCACCHI IF0314
LE02104370 ANGLO-AMERICAN LITERATURE ANNA SCACCHI LE0613
LE03120322 ANGLO-AMERICAN LITERATURE 2 ANNA SCACCHI LE0613
SUP6076646 ANGLO-AMERICAN LITERATURE B 2 ANNA SCACCHI LE0613

ECTS: details
Type Scientific-Disciplinary Sector Credits allocated
Core courses L-LIN/11 Anglo-American Languages and Literature 9.0

Mode of delivery (when and how)
Period Second semester
Year 3rd Year
Teaching method frontal

Organisation of didactics
Type of hours Credits Hours of
teaching
Hours of
Individual study
Shifts
Lecture 9.0 63 162.0 No turn

Calendar
Start of activities 26/02/2018
End of activities 01/06/2018

Examination board
Examination board not defined

Syllabus
Prerequisites: Students should be familiar with basic facts of US history, culture and literature and have an advanced knowledge of English
Target skills and knowledge: You will become familiar with the most important theorists in the current debate on representation and will be introduced to Visual Culture Studies, with a special focus on race. We will rely on these skills to examine the representation of blackness in US culture and in the Black diaspora in the Americas. You will develop a critical awareness of the notions of representation/self-representation/reality through a survey of the historical transformations of blackness in fiction, films and popular culture
Examination methods: Final paper, about 15 pages long, for each module and discussion of the paper. The student can opt for an oral exam, which is mandatory if you have not attended classes. Active participation in class discussions.
Assessment criteria: The student will be evaluated according to her acquired competence in the most relevant aspects of the critical debate and her ability to apply it in original readings of the assigned texts. Evaluation will be based on
attendance and active participation to class discussions: 25%
paper: 50%
oral discussion of paper: 25%
Course unit contents: Representing Blackness in the US and the Black Diaspora: Literature, the Arts, Popular Culture
Race, according to most contemporary critical race theorists, is not a biological fact but rather a symbolic category which is constantly contructed, deconstructed and reconstructed via discursive practices. After a preliminary introduction to the current debate on the relation between reality and representation and to the interpretive methodologies employed by Visual Culture Studies, this course will explore the multiple meanings of blackness produced by the history of the Black Diaspora in the Americas. We will examine an array of texts (novels and short stories, films, graphic novels, popular culture), organized so as to illuminate a number of conceptual and thematic knots (gender, racial stereotypes, adoption/subversion of stereotypes, representations of black heroism), as a way to achieve a critical understanding of narrations and counternarrations of black identity.
Planned learning activities and teaching methods: Classes will be delivered both as lectures and seminars. Students' participation in discussions and through brief oral presentation will be encouraged. Because of the multidisciplinary focus of the topics explored and its methodological approach, the course will often rely on films and other audio visual material and, whenever possible, will host guest lecturers.
Additional notes about suggested reading: You will find all assigned readings in our library or on my homepage but copies of the novels, if in print, should be bought.
Students not attending classes should contact me at least two months before their exam.
Textbooks (and optional supplementary readings)
  • Melville, Herman, Benito Cereno, in Melville's Short Novels.. --: Norton Critical Editions, 2001.
  • Douglass, Frederick, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself. --: --, --. Cerca nel catalogo
  • Butler, Octavia, Kindred. Boston: Beacon press, 2003. (solo per gli studenti della magistrale) Cerca nel catalogo
  • Baldwin, James, "Sonny's Blues". --: --, 1957. Cerca nel catalogo
  • Hughes, Langston, "One Friday Morning". --: --, 1941.
  • Walker, Alice, "Everyday Use". --: --, 1973. Cerca nel catalogo